LED recess lights

How They Work Nothing beats the rich natural light that sunrooms allow in. Once the sun sets, however, you’ll need adequate indoor lighting to protect you from stubbed toes and perilously misplaced legos. The challenge with lighting a sunroom is that recessed lights need to be placed inside the insulated panels of the roof, where they can build up a dangerous amount of heat, especially with incandescent bulbs. Even average LED lights, which are far more energy efficient, generate too much heat to be considered safe. The issue is that the converter in a typical LED bulb creates heat when lowering the 110 volt electrical current in your home down to a usable level. Fortunately, LivingSpace Sunrooms offers a simple solution: integrated LED lights with separated transformers. Energy Efficient LivingSpace is committed to bringing you an efficient, long-lasting sunroom product. Our LED Recess Lights are one of the most energy-efficient lighting technologies on the market today. They have a lifespan of 50,000 hours, meaning they can shine for more than five-and-a-half years before burning out. That’s 25 times longer than a comparable incandescent bulb. LEDs are able to do this while using 75% less energy, on average. Furthering this comparison, incandescent light bulbs release 90% of their energy as heat. Competing light bulbs, such as Compact Fluorescent Light, lose 80% of their energy as heat. Meanwhile, LED Recess Lights only lose 20% of their energy to heat. This video helps visually demonstrate the heat loss. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAcc1WBbE1MThe Department of Energy suggests that the use of LED lights offers the best opportunity for energy savings in the United States. Widespread use of LEDs could save approximately 348 TWh of electricity by 2027. This is equivalent to 44 large electric power plants or $30 billion of electricity costs. Individually, those utilizing LEDs can save…

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How long does it take to build a sunroom?

One of the most common questions we hear from homeowners considering a sunroom addition is how long will it take to build? And with good reason! Large remodeling projects can be daunting, with the prospect of saws buzzing throughout the day as dust and scraps accumulate in your yard, while the project drags on for months. Thankfully, adding an engineered sunroom is a far simpler and faster process than a traditional room addition. Start-to-finish, a prefabricated sunroom addition is often completed in 2-3 weeks. That includes the time necessary for setting the foundation, framing the deck, assembling the structure, securing the roof, and finally, installing the doors, windows, and accessories.It’s important to note that this time does not include the time necessary to design and plan your sunroom. Before work begins, your design consultant will finalize the layout of your sunroom, obtain the necessary permits and engineering approvals, and send your sunroom to production. This typically takes around 2 months, depending on local building requirements and special design considerations.Let’s break down the different steps in building your sunroom: Ensuring a Solid Foundation Average Time: 1-2 DaysCreating a sturdy foundation for your sunroom is critical, and builders should always take the time needed to guarantee the foundation is both safe and secure. Thankfully, innovative new technologies allow our partners to construct a foundation in a fraction of the time it takes to pour traditional concrete footings. Products such as Diamond Piers and Techno Posts use steel piles, driven deep into the ground, to create a stable platform on which to build a deck. If conditions are favorable, this process can be completed in a single day. That being said, some homeowners prefer the look of concrete slab for their sunroom. Pouring a level concrete slab is usually handled by independent subcontractors…

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How long does it take to build a sunroom?
how long does it take to build a sunroom?

Are sunrooms insulated? A quick explanation of r-value and u-value

[rt_reading_time label="Reading Time:" postfix="minutes" postfix_singluar="minute"] R-value and U-value are terms frequently used in construction and sunroom manufacturing. Both measure specific, important variables in a sunroom to help you better understand the quality of the product you are considering. However, they can be confusing to somebody who hasn’t been exposed to construction guidelines before. This post explains some of the terms surrounding the insulation value of materials and building products, to help you better equip yourself as an informed buyer. What is R-value? An R-value measures a material’s ability to resist heat traveling through it. Every material used in a building component contributes to its overall R-value. A higher R-value indicates better insulation and greater thermal performance. It also translates to a more energy-efficient home. Meanwhile, a low R-value makes properly regulating your home’s temperature difficult. High R-value building materials may also be required by local and state governments for those living in heavy snow areas. Insulation requirements across the United States   The U.S. Department of Energy presents a comprehensive map outlining those unique needs of each area of the United States. For example, those living in southern Florida or Hawaii only need sunrooms with R-values between R-30 to R-49. Meanwhile, those living in the Great Lakes region should consider sunrooms with R-values between R-49 and R-60. Insulation is also necessary for your flooring. Those in southern Florida or Hawaii only need to insulate the floors of their sunrooms with a minimum R-value of R-13. In contrast, those in the Great Lakes region need to insulate the floors of their sunrooms with R-values between R-25 and R-30. Traditional construction builds homes based off these values, and LivingSpace believes that the best quality sunroom exists within these confines. LivingSpace Sunrooms offers walls, floors, and roofs with R-values ranging between R-24 and…

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Are sunrooms insulated? A quick explanation of r-value and u-value
r-value insulation

Sunroom skylights: Why you should fill your sunroom with additional light

What are sunroom skylights? Sunroom skylights are light transmitting elements that help form the roof of a home. They bring natural light into the sunroom through the use of glass or polycabronate materials. Open skylights were first used in the Pantheon during Ancient Roman times. The “oculus” is an 8.3 meter wide circular opening at the top of the building. Apollodorus built the oculus to bring light and air into the building. Furthermore, the oculus serves as the only source of natural light in the building beyond the entrance. The open skylight brought the elements into the Pantheon, but in some instances, this was welcomed. Rain cooled the building during Rome’s summer months. Skylights manufactured in the Industrial Revolution began to approach the sunroom skylights used in LivingSpace’s sunrooms. By this time, technology produced larger, more stable panes of glass that were glazed to better seal out the weather. Therefore, they were useful to people trying to naturally light their homes, and skylights became common in wealthy landowners’ homes. Today, skylights are more common, and technological advances have made them more efficient for homeowners. LivingSpace makes and installs state-of-the-art sunroom skylights for those who want to bring more natural light and enjoyment into a sunroom. Will a skylight reduce my sunroom’s insulation? Concerns suggest sunroom skylights can create a room that is unusable during the summer or winter because of poor insulation. For example, sunroom skylights made with low-quality glass provide poor insulation power and make a sunroom uncomfortably warm during summer months. However, LivingSpace exists to bring a true four-season sunroom to the market. Consequently, LivingSpace uses materials that let you enjoy your sunroom year-round. LivingSpace ensures their sunroom skylights are manufactured to function purposefully without corrupting the sunroom. The type of glass used to construct a sunroom skylight is critical to the insulation performance. LivingSpace’s sunroom…

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10 reasons to consider a conservatory greenhouse

History of Conservatory Greenhouses Conservatory greenhouses have grown unique plants uncommon to the area throughout history. Conservatory greenhouses originated in northern Europe during the seventeenth century. Wealthy landowners utilized them to cultivate the citrus fruits they bought from Mediterranean traders. During the 19th century, the love of gardening brought about England's golden age of conservatory greenhouses. Nevertheless, conservatories have evolved as time has progressed. Now, people use them as places to relax, entertain, and dine. However, they are still optimal environments for growing plants. Youtube: 10 Reasons to Own a Conservatory Greenhouse Conservatory greenhouses have several benefits accompanying them. For example, the warmer climate allows you to extend your growing season into the early and late winter months. The warmer climate also allows more tropical plants to thrive, as you are giving them a familiar environment. Conservatory greenhouses allow you to enjoy homegrown food, which will give you a greater feeling of self-reliance. Furthermore, it offers the option to start a small entrepreneurial business from your own backyard. The fruits, vegetables, and flowers grown in a conservatory greenhouse can sell at local farmer's markets. This brings in extra money while allowing you to interact regularly with your community. Successful greenhouses are built with a variety of different materials. The technology associated with a  LivingSpace conservatory allows plants to grow in an efficient and well-insulated environment. Consequently, this gives plants the best opportunity to prosper through all conditions. Youtube: Go Out & About at Martha's Conservatory Greenhouse In this video, Martha Stewart takes you through her New York greenhouse conservatory while pointing out the beautiful plants she is able to cultivate inside it. She has been able to collect an eclectic mix of horticulture in her home because of the effectiveness of a conservatory greenhouse. These plants have been able to…

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10 reasons to consider a conservatory greenhouse
conservatory greenhouses

Make a television room out of your sunroom

[rt_reading_time label="Reading Time:" postfix="minutes" postfix_singular="minute"] A sunroom is likely to become the most trafficked room in your home once it is constructed. Consequently, it will be important to plan the right way to utilize the added square footage. The functionality of the sunroom will dictate the way it should be designed and decorated. LivingSpace Sunrooms wants to give you the resources available to create a timeless area. Our second installment of our comprehensive interior design guide will outline the prospective options available through a television room. BUILDING A TELEVISION ROOM A LivingSpace sunroom offers unique opportunities if used as a television room. For example, a sunroom allows neighborhood barbecue guests to socialize in the yard while simultaneously watching the night’s broadcasted game. A sunroom also allows friends to gather for ritualistic Monday evening television show viewing parties. However, televisions are notorious eyesores in the home, and they are difficult to decorate around. They are large, black rectangles that function by dominating a room. This can act as a problem within a sunroom. A poorly decorated sunroom can let the television distract from the panoramic views offered by a LivingSpace sunroom, or vice versa. Nonetheless, deliberate attention to interior design can help you avoid this predicament. Luckily, LivingSpace allows customers to fully customize their sunrooms to match their preferences. There are plenty of decorating options that will allow a television to coexist with the decor and the outdoors. Lonny gives different tips and options to consider. Blended Backdrop A flat screen against a black accent wall will allow your television to hide in plain sight. This emphasizes the colors projected by the television when it is on. It also allows the outdoors to take over and let conversation flow naturally when the television is off. Niche Idea Sectioning the room will…

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Make a television room out of your sunroom
sunroom television room interior design

Minimalist living room makes interior design elegant

[rt_reading_time label="Reading Time:" postfix="minutes" postfix_singular="minute"] A sunroom is likely to become the most trafficked room in your home once it is constructed. Consequently, it will be important to plan the right way to utilize the added square footage. The functionality of the sunroom will dictate the way it should be designed and decorated. LivingSpace Sunrooms wants to give you the resources available to create a timeless area. Therefore, this first installment of our comprehensive project will outline the prospective options available through a minimalist living room. Further installments will work to outline further options. Building a Minimalist Living Room A LivingSpace sunroom is a perfect place to create a living room or relaxation area within your home. A living room or relaxation area will give the sunroom versatility as you use it for numerous different occasions. It can be a social place for family conversation, a quiet place for reading, or a stress-free place to unwind after a long day. It is important to maximize the opportunities a sunroom can provide. This can be done through your deliberate attention to interior design. Warren Lloyd has worked for many years as an interior designer and architect in the Salt Lake and Seattle areas. His work has been described as “quiet” but not silent. It is void of clutter. In general, interior design champions this method of styling a room because it visually and emotionally calms those utilizing it. Lloyd says this idea of simplifying allows the room to move closer to the core of its function, which allows those using it to better focus. This thought is furthered by Studio McGee as they suggest breathing space will allow your hard work to stand out. This gives a purpose to the “white space” created by a decluttered living area. A decluttered layout…

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Minimalist living room makes interior design elegant
minimalist living room

3 differences between a conservatory and a sunroom

[rt_reading_time label="Reading Time:" postfix="minutes" postfix_singular="minute"] When you are considering adding a living space to your home, you might come across sunrooms and conservatories. Although some people use the terms interchangeably, they are actually quite different. Regardless of their differences, they both offer several advantages to homeowners. While conservatories are different from sunrooms, they come with a unique set of benefits. The following are just a few that you can take advantage of when you build a conservatory addition: • Increased curb appeal • Perfect for gardening • Great natural lighting If you think you might prefer a sunroom addition, you can expect to enjoy after you have a sunroom added to your home: • More living space • Increased sunlight • Insulation options Despite having fairly similar benefits, there are at least three major differences between sunrooms and conservatories. Purpose The largest difference between the two rooms is their purpose. While conservatories are designed for horticulture, sunrooms are more for recreation. For example, conservatories are great for providing plants with plenty of sunlight to grow while also protecting them from wind and cold weather. Sunrooms are designed to be an extension of your living space, whether you want it to be an office, family room, or dining area. Materials Unlike sunrooms, conservatories feature more transparent materials, such as glass, plastic, etc. In fact, conservatories typically have 50% glass on the walls and 75% on the roof. On the other hand, sunrooms usually have an opaque roof to reduce the amount of direct sunlight. It also isn’t uncommon for sunrooms to have walls without glass. Sunlight The other difference related to the materials is sunlight. Though you might think the name of a sunroom suggests it gets a lot of light, conservatories actually get more. This is largely due to the…

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Enhance your local sales by building trust within the community

ENHANCE YOUR LOCAL SALES BY BUILDING TRUST WITHIN THE COMMUNITY [rt_reading_time label="Reading Time:" postfix="minutes" postfix_singular="minute"] Whether you are doing business in a busy metropolis or a suburban region, chances are that there are several remodeling companies that are all vying for the business of local residents. So, how can you stand out from the crowd without pushy sales tactics and breaking your marketing budget? The key to a quality contractor-consumer relationship is trust, and building that trust starts with grassroots efforts within your community. Homeowners looking for a remodeling contractor want to feel confident knowing that the company they choose isn’t all about the profit. Instead, they want to work with a team that is connected to the needs of local residents and takes part in establishing themselves as a positive force within the community. Taking your marketing tactics back to basics and building up trust with potential clients is easier than you may think, and the following tips can get you started in boosting local sales while also making an impact on the community as a whole: 1. Jump In and Give Back If you really want to do some good within the local area and make a good impression on customers, charity work is a great place to start. Sponsor a local little league team, attend community outreach events as a company, or take part in volunteer work that makes your community a better place. Not only will this add to the overall morale of your employees, it will also get you noticed when you’re regularly showing up to help out while wearing your company shirts and uniforms. 2. Take Initiative to Think Outside the Box If you are doing business in a quiet area that doesn’t have a lot of big-name charity events happening, why not start…

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Packaging a product for greater customer satisfaction

[rt_reading_time label="Reading Time:" postfix="minutes" postfix_singular="minute"] You know that feeling of excitement and value that you get when you buy an expensive product that is beautifully packaged? The consumer experience is more than just the actual product you receive, it is, quite literally, the experience you have in relation to the product. Whether it is high-end packaging, a handwritten note of thanks, or any other small detail that makes you feel special when making a major purchase, the simplest things can make a lasting impact in your overall satisfaction as a customer. So, how does this translate to the home remodeling industry? Although you aren’t just packaging a product and sending it off to the end consumer, there is still the connection of your customers making an investment in something that is important in their lives. And it pays to present your services in the best way possible to personalize their experience! You want your customers to feel like they made a wise choice in choosing your company as their home remodeler, and there are a few simple things that you can do along the way to support the emotional experience of investing in home renovations: 1. Polish Your Home Presentation Companies within the home service industry can have a reputation for pushy sales tactics and convoluted estimates, so it’s important to let your customers know from the start that you’re not like the “other guys”. Train your sales reps in providing low-key, efficient home consultations that focus on the needs of the specific homeowner—without the pressure! By truly listening to their concerns and ideas, you will get a better understanding of how to personalize the rest of the process for them. 2. Provide Tangible Design Plans It’s one thing to have your customers sign a piece of paper outlining your…

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